Popularity isn’t a Measure of a Diet’s Effectiveness

A lot of popular things aren’t effective. Almost any of the popular diets will work, but most are unsustainable.  The results produced by extreme exercise and diet programs aren’t any more sustainable than the programs themselves. Quickly done, quickly undone. When I argue that the results produced by a low card diet aren’t sustainable, people will defend it as if I was attacking a member of their family. A low-carb diet certainly wouldn’t be my choice, but if you can sustain it as a lifestyle, then go for it.

Why are extreme, overly restrictive diets and motivation so popular if they aren’t practical solutions? Popularity is no indication of effectiveness. Look at the popularity of the reality TV program, The Biggest Loser. Forcing 400-pound people to work out four hours a day on a low-calorie diet makes for good TV, but the results are abysmal. Virtually all the contestants fail to keep the weight off. Approximately 14 out of 15 contestants gain back all the weight eight months after the program ends.[i] Continue reading Popularity isn’t a Measure of a Diet’s Effectiveness

Analysis Paralysis

The overabundance of information has caused many people to fall into the trap of analysis paralysis. Over-analysis can become an active form of procrastination. No one ever got in shape by reading a book. The fitness industry provides a constant stream of gimmicky diet and exercise plans that promise quick and easy results. Each program claims to have found the secret to six-pack abs. Millions of people waste their time, money, and effort on worthless supplements, extreme diets, and overly complicated workout programs. Continue reading Analysis Paralysis