Five Things You Need to Know About Willpower for a Successful New Year’s Resolution

A lack of understanding of the fundamental nature of willpower helps explain why approximately 80% of those that make a New Year’s resolution will admit defeat by February. They will look at their list and blame their lack of willpower when they should be blaming their list, and their lack of focus. No one has enough willpower for that list. Our willpower is severely limited, and every demand for self-restraint draws from a single source. Sometimes a single willpower challenge will feel like one demand too many.

Here is What You Need to Know about Willpower:

  1. All your willpower demands draw from a single inner reservoir that depletes with use.
  2. The more simultaneous demands you place on your willpower, the quicker your willpower supply will evaporate and leave you naked to temptation.
  3. Our willpower is highest in the morning and depletes as the day wears on.
  4. The best use of our willpower is to eliminate temptations BEFORE our willpower reserves run out, so there is nothing to indulge our desires.
  5. Habits don’t drain our willpower reserves.

Continue reading “Five Things You Need to Know About Willpower for a Successful New Year’s Resolution”

Advertisements

A DISCIPLINED LIFESTYLE DOESN’T REQUIRE A MARATHON OF EFFORT

The next biggest lie about living a disciplined lifestyle is that it requires a marathon of effort. It doesn’t. It only requires you manifest enough discipline and motivation to make the routine a habit. The initial resistance we encounter doesn’t last beyond a couple of months. The authors of The ONE Thing: The Surprisingly Truth Behind Extraordinary Results say success is not a marathon of disciplined action. It is a sprint fueled by just enough discipline to build a habit.  Habits are harder to start than they are to sustain. The key is to identify the behavior you need to adopt and then work at it long enough to make it a habit.

Continue reading “A DISCIPLINED LIFESTYLE DOESN’T REQUIRE A MARATHON OF EFFORT”

THE LAW OF DIMINISHING INTENT

The Law of Diminishing Intent says the time to act is when the idea is hot, and the emotion is strong. When we delay, our intent quickly starts to diminish. The feelings grow cold, and the wisdom is wasted. We should follow through on the idea with action. The time to move is when we are inspired to act. BEGIN. Start installing the necessary habits and disciplines. Do it while the idea is clear in our mind, and the desire is strongest in our heart. Begin while your emotions are stirred.

Installing NEW routines and behaviors requires a herculean disciplined effort. Do not squander your desire. Put it to good use. Take immediate action. Hesitation allows your desire to install good habits that will improve your life to pass without being employed. Don’t allow the emotion to diminish through indecision. Indecision is mental paralysis. Indecision means what could be is postponed or may never be. Indecision means putting off what we could do, what we should do. Indecision means the opportunity waits. Indecision means the door remains closed. The longer we delay, the less likely we are to act. Our desire quickly erodes and fades from existence. The wisdom is wasted, and the idea is soon forgotten. “Indecision is the greatest thief of opportunity.” Jim Rohn Continue reading “THE LAW OF DIMINISHING INTENT”

THE EVERYDAY METHOD OF HABIT FORMATION

Everyday removes the need to make a decision. The behavior becomes automatic. No need to stop and think about what day it is. Every day is Monday. I start virtually every day the same. I wake-up at the same time and the first hour is always the same. I thrive on the regularity. I love how it sets the tone for the rest of my day. That first hour is magical. It is life changing. Continue reading THE EVERYDAY METHOD OF HABIT FORMATION

How to Pick a Diet & Exercise Program

“Long-term consistency trumps short-term intensity.”
Bruce Lee

I suggest you choose a diet and exercise program that is sustainable; because consistency is more important than intensity. If your program isn’t sustainable, your results won’t be either. It is common sense, but how many people have done an extreme program only to revert to their previous condition. You wouldn’t believe how many otherwise intelligent people have told me that the Adkins diet “worked” for them, but they had gained back all the weight. The problem with quick fixes is they don’t last. Continue reading “How to Pick a Diet & Exercise Program”